Another “new” interview with Peanut Butter Wolf, conducted a day after Record Store Day 2013, and right before his Red Bull 45’s performance. This interview was conducted at Banana’s Music warehouse in St. Pete, Florida. I just want to reiterate how incredibly dope it was to hang with PBW and J. Rocc while they were crate digging, on a day where the record store was supposed to be closed. Priceless moments. PBW is very approachable and laid back, and we even grabbed a slice with him at New York New York in Ybor City. His performances were top notch, and he gave away “Wolf Pick” 45’s to the crowd at one of the record stores. I attended all three of his performances. 

A “new” interview of Adrian Younge I conducted about one year ago. This interview was before his performance with Ghostface Killah. This interview was conducted in Ybor City, Florida. 

twins… almost as good as orange soda

(Source: tvpixels, via temporaryforever)

temporaryforever:

IM A BITER NOT A WRITER

classic video showing many (not all) lines that JayZ has bitten from other artists

Quantity is quality, like, right?

How many dead rappers can you jack in your career?

It must be New Jack City cuz Jay lives there.

J.M.W. Turner is a British artist from the Romantic period and although that era typically bores me, I was very moved by this man’s paintings. His work is a precursor to Impressionism, and I admire the skewed line between reality and fantasy that he walks. It gives the viewer’s mind amble room for imagination. Turner’s striking use of color also greatly impacts me. The sun seems to be a strong influence on his work, and his landscapes can be blinding. The strong red tones and white tones fill me with emotion, and I don’t really understand why. 
This is “The Slave Ship,” painted in 1840.

J.M.W. Turner is a British artist from the Romantic period and although that era typically bores me, I was very moved by this man’s paintings. His work is a precursor to Impressionism, and I admire the skewed line between reality and fantasy that he walks. It gives the viewer’s mind amble room for imagination. Turner’s striking use of color also greatly impacts me. The sun seems to be a strong influence on his work, and his landscapes can be blinding. The strong red tones and white tones fill me with emotion, and I don’t really understand why. 

This is “The Slave Ship,” painted in 1840.